Tuesday, August 27, 2013

Tooth Pain May Not Always Be Dental Related!

Did you know that toothaches can have a variety of causes and not all of them are actual dental issues?

You might find it interesting and informative to know some of these causes of tooth and jaw pain that are not related to the teeth!

1. Sinusitis and pressure in the nasal cavities and the air passages of the cheek bones can cause pain in the jawbone that may feel like a toothache.

2. Many people do not know that angina pain and some heart ailments can also cause jaw pain and/or tooth pain as well.

3. Occasionally, toothaches are caused by nerve ailments and neuralgia.

4. TMJ (temporomandibular joint dysfunction) can also cause chronic pain that is not related to a toothache.

It's never a bad idea to check with a doctor as well as a dentist in the event of unexplained tooth pain.

Keep smiling!
Original post by walnutflwr on November 2, 2012

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Random Dental Facts...Did You Know?

More endless research on the internet turned up these interesting trivial facts!
  • In the year 1900, the tooth fairy would leave approximately 12 cents. In the year 1998, one dollar. Imagine, at the current rate of inflation....the year 2013....$$$$$
  • You cannot conceal your smoking habit with mouthwash or brushing before a visit! That's right, your dentist knows :).....Apparently, the smoke residue seeps into the tissue surrounding your gums....
  • You would need to have more than 300 amalgam fillings to even come close to the amount of mercury that is considered dangerous.
  • 100 years ago, 50% of adults in North America were toothless!
  • The first electric toothbrush was introduced in 1939.
  • The antibacterial properties in Black and Green Tea can help prevent cavities.
  • Chewing gum that contains Xylitol can help prevent cavities by reducing the bad bacteria in your mouth!
  • Mouthwashes containing alcohol are only temporarily effective, and the alcohol dries out your mouth.
  • Snails have teeth! Thousands of them....
  • Turtles are toothless!
  • You will get more radiation from an hour in the sun than from a dental x-ray.
One more....this one is great!
  • A survey once done by Time Magazine concluded that 59% of Americans would prefer to sit in a dentist's chair than to sit next to someone on a cell phone!
Enjoy, and Keep Smiling!

Tuesday, August 20, 2013


Gingivitis is the inflammation of the gums. This is the initial stage of gum disease, and the earliest to treat.

Gingivitis is due to a long term effects of plaque deposits. Plaque is a sticky material made up of bacteria, mucus, and food debris that develops on the exposed parts of the tooth.

Ways to reduce Gingivitis is by having your teeth cleaned on a regular bases. Brush and floss every day, along with using a mouth rinse.
If you start noticing any of these symptoms consult with your dentist....
  • bleeding of the gums
  • bright red or red-purple appearance to gums
  • mouth sores
  • swollen gums
  • gums that are tender to touch

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Scientists Deem Chocolate Good For Your Teeth!

I actually had to laugh when I first read up on this topic. All those years of dentists coaching you to eat less sweets and VOILA! A dream come true for me and I'm sure many other chocolate lovers! As it turns out, scientists report that parts of the cocoa bean that are used to make chocolate, also have natural occurring antibacterial agents that help fight mouth bacteria that causes tooth decay. The polyphenolen in cocoa has been shown to inhibit the growth of of bacterias such as Streptococcus which produces the sticky substance called glucan that allows cavity causing bacterias to adhere themselves to the teeth. I also read that there are a few European companies such as Barry Callebaut and Smet who have created the first chocolate that does not cause cavities. This chocolate is made with a different type of sugar called isomaltulose which does not increase acidity levels in the mouth that lead to tooth decay. Keep in mind while scientists have deemed chocolate good for your teeth, it still is loaded with calories and sugars that can lead to weight problems and such, so it's good to continue to consume them in moderation. Original post by Dawn_DA

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

What is Plaque?

 Plaque is a sticky, pale yellow film of bacteria that forms on our teeth. Plaque can lead to dental problems like tartar, gum disease and tooth decay. When plaque comes into contact with the sugars and starches in the foods you eat, it produces acids that can cause cavities.The best way to avoid problems often associated with plaque is by making regular visits to your dentist. See your dentist at least once every 6 months for a complete checkup and a thorough cleaning .Brushing and flossing your teeth is the most effective way to remove plaque at home. It is recommended that you brush and floss  after every meal, and especially before you go to bed at night. Also try and replace your toothbrush every 3 or 4 months -using an old or worn toothbrush is less effective.  A pre-brushing rinse might help to loosen and detach plaque for easier removal during brushing.

Friday, August 9, 2013

Corrective Jaw Surgery

Corrective Jaw Surgery (Orthognathic Surgery) is preformed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. This surgery helps correct overbites, underbites, or misaligned teeth. This surgery can also improve your facial appearance. Your Orthodontist will determine if you will need this surgery.

The procedure:
After your required length of orthodontic treatment, the actual surgical procedure may only take 1-3 hours to complete. Both your orthodontist and Oral surgeon will be in the room for the procedure. This will take place at the hospital under anesthesia. You may have to stay overnight, but usually released the next day.

After surgery you can expect pain, swelling, bruising, minor bleeding. You will be able to speak, drink, eat immediately because you will not have your jaws wired shut! Doctors will recommend blended food for 2 weeks and then gradually work to solid foods..


Initial Orthodontic treatment (braces/retainer) usually cost around $2,000-$5,000. Corrective Jaw Surgery usually cost around $20,000 -$30,000. You may want to check to see if your insurance will cover this procedure.

Risks involved with this surgery:
There is little risk that are associated with the surgery. But you could experience numbness due to nerve damage. Bleeding may also occur. To minimize the risks of corrective jaw surgery, make sure you follow all recovery and oral care instructions.
Want to read more? Click Here

Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Why You Should Invest In a Tongue Scraper

Yes, really! A tongue scraper. You can find them in drugstores and department stores and they're usually under $2. Now, here's the reason why. Simply brushing your tongue isn't enough! I'm guilty of that...I thought I had the right idea, but I was corrected by an article I saw this morning about the importance of scraping your tongue vs. brushing it. Food imbeds itself in the papillae on your tongue every time you eat the same way that dirt and particles get imbedded in shag carpeting...(yes, they actually used that as an example) and it builds up and sits there day after day and rots, literally, on your tongue, causing bad breath. Using a tongue scraper once a day can remove the buildup of food and liquids and keep you out of embarassing situations caused by halitosis...(ummm, bad breath)! Try to make it a part of your daily hygiene routine. You'll be glad you did. Oh, and be sure to check with your dentist or hygienist because many of them include tongue scrapers now in the hygiene kits that they hand out after a cleaning. And as always, keep smiling!

Monday, August 5, 2013

What's an impacted tooth?

An impacted tooth is a tooth that gets blocked as it is pushing through the gum into your mouth. A common tooth to get impacted is the wisdom teeth.

Wisdom teeth, also known as the third molars usually begin to come in between the ages of 17 and 21. Most cases they may become impacted due to the lack of room in your mouth. They may come in sideways or be tilted in your jaw. 

You can have an impacted tooth and not even know, as some are painless. When an impacted wisdom tooth tries to come in it can become infected and swollen. Sometimes you even feel pain in nearby teeth, or in the ear on that side of your face. 

If untreated an impacted tooth can lead to an infection called pericoronitis. This infection can spread to the throat or into the neck. Impacted teeth also can get cavities, lead to tooth movement, decay or gum disease. It also can change the way your teeth come together.

original Post by 

Friday, August 2, 2013

Overcoming Dental Phobia

To begin, I think it's important to note that dental phobia is a very common affliction, with over 80% of the population having at least some level of anxiety and fear over dental procedures. So, to the dental phobics out there, please know that you are not alone!! Conversely, a higher percentage of women have reported having dental phobia than men. (Ok, I'll admit that this statistic surprised me. Just a little.) Having worked in this industry for the past 16 years, it occurred to me to write on this topic because I have witnessed so many people who have been diagnosed as needing major restorative work all because they were afraid to see a dentist for preventative care. Some have avoided the dentist for 15 to 20 years! Anyway, I did a little hunting on the web and found some interesting ideas for overcoming dental phobias. Hope this is helpful! 
  • The first and, I think, most important thing is to find a dentist that you can trust. The best method for this is word of mouth. Talk to a trusted friend or co-worker, or ask family member for a referral. Chances are if they've had a good experience, you will too.
  • Proceed with treatment at your own speed. (Except in the case of an emergency, of course.) Do not allow yourself to be rushed into treatment before you are ready. Mental preparation is important to your dental experience. Discuss all options with your dentist prior to the treatment. Knowing what to expect goes a long way toward relaxation.
  • Try to bring a spouse or trusted friend with you for treatment. Sometimes just knowing someone is there (even if they stay in the waiting room) can help to relax you and put your mind at ease. Also, sometimes talking about your fears with that person can help to alleviate and irradicate the jitters. You might even be surprised to learn that they have similar fears!
  • Predetermine a "stop signal" with your dentist. Most people will just raise a hand....that seems to be the most common signal, but the important thing is that he (the dentist) needs to know if you are experiencing discomfort at any level. Sometimes all that is required is to stop for a moment and let the feeling pass, or if you are in pain, to administer more anesthetic.
  • Bring an MP3 player or CD player with headphones to distract you. Music calms the soul, and consequently the mind and body. If you are in to motivational CD's or inspirational types of listening material, that is helpful as well. Many of the new state of the art dental facilities already have these things available.
These are just a few of the ideas that are available on the internet to help overcome your fear of the dentist. Here is a link for some information on the newest dental techniques and tools coming out on the market. Many of these are designed to aid or eliminate pain and anxiety.

Original Post by walnutflwr 7/15/2008