Thursday, July 28, 2011

'When do I take my child to the dentist for the first time?'

After some research on line I found most articles said about when they are two or three, when all 20 baby teeth have come in. After the first visit, children should see a dentist twice a year for cleanings and checkups. These visits can allow your dentist to detect flaws early, possibly preventing more serious problems in the future. Hope that helps some of you out there who might have wondered the same thing. :)

Wednesday, July 27, 2011

Tooth Discoloration

Are you starting to notice your teeth are becoming discolored? Here are a few reason why this might be happening?

  1. Foods/Drinks

  2. Tobacco Use

  3. Poor Dental Hygiene

  4. Disease

  5. Medications

  6. Advanced Age

  7. Trauma

  8. Environment

Tuesday, July 26, 2011

Chewing Ice: Sooo Good, But So Bad!!!

Chewing ice is a common, thoughtless habit that most of us are guilty of. We all know it's bad for you to chew ice, but if you're anything like me, you've found yourself chomping on a cube or two every now and then. Seems harmless, but according to the following facts, an ice chewing habit can mean trouble in more ways than one:

-Chewing ice is a sign of iron deficiency anemia and other nutritional deficiencies.

-Chewing ice is also a sign of Pica- a medical condition where people have strong urges and cravings to chew on non-nutritional substances such as rocks, pottery, dirt and ice.

-Chewing ice is also a guaranteed seat at the dentist office. It causes tiny fractures and chips which could lead to an abscess and cause you to need a root canal. Cosmetic dentistry to fix chipped or broken teeth can be pricey and is often not covered by insurance companies.

-Constant chewing can also damage existing fillings and crowns as they are not as structurally sound as a natural tooth. This could lead to a lot of pain and an expensive dental bill.

It's a difficult habit to break not to mention how annoying it is to hear someone else do it. But to this day I still can't help myself. Anyone else have an ice-chewing addiction like me? :D

Thursday, July 21, 2011

Answers to Common Dental Questions

While researching this morning for a good blog topic, I came across a web page that has a really informative FAQ's page. There are answers for a variety of issues from what causes morning breath to wearing dentures! Very cool. Check out the site, you'll learn something new, for sure.

Here you will find the answers to 25 common dental questions.

Tuesday, July 19, 2011

Soda Or Pop? It's Teeth Trouble By Any Name!

People across North America use different words to identify a sugary, carbonated soft drink. But however they say it, they're talking about something that can cause serious oral health problems.
Soft drinks have emerged as one of the most significant dietary sources of tooth decay, affecting people of all ages. Acids and acidic sugar byproducts in soft drinks soften tooth enamel, contributing to the formation of cavities. In extreme cases, softer enamel combined with improper brushing, grinding of the teeth or other conditions can lead to tooth loss.

Here are somethings that you can do...

  1. substitute different drinks

  2. Rinse with water afterward

  3. use fluoride toothpaste and mouthwash

To read the article

Wednesday, July 13, 2011

Does Dental Enamel Regenerate?

Dental enamel, unlike bones, does not regenerate or "heal" once it is damaged. Dental enamel is formed during the original growth of the tooth underneath the gums. While there are many factors that can contribute to the loss of dental enamel, such as poor dental hygiene or certain hereditary conditions, there is good news. Researchers are actively seeking treatments and therapies that could change everything. Of course, proper hygiene and regular visits to your dentist are the best way to combat any kind of dental dilemma, but for dental enamel in particular, there are now certain treatments that can help slow the process of enamel degeneration that can be applied during your regular dental visits as part of your preventative maintenance regimen. For more information on such treatments, click HERE.

Monday, July 11, 2011

Bruxism (Teeth Grinding): Did you know?

I suffer from bruxism.....I have for many years now, and I thought I'd do a little research and blog about it because it affects your body in so so many ways. First, you should know that it is an unconscious, involuntary thing. When you are unconsciously grinding your teeth (clenching while awake, clenching and grinding while you are asleep) you are putting up to ten times the force on your teeth and jaws than when you are chewing food! Many people don't even realize they're doing it, and consequently, suffer from unexplained problems such as jaw pain, muscle fatigue, headaches, hearing loss, ringing in the ears, TMJ and a variety of other conditions, aside from the fact that it can fracture, shorten and cause your teeth to loosen, erode and decay. Long term effects are distressing; it can actually change your physical appearance! It can cause bags under the eyes, enlargement of the muscles around the joints of the jaw and curling of the skin around the lips. There are devices (night orthotics) that dentists can make for you to wear when you're sleeping to prevent this damage from happening! If you suspect that you are having this problem, ask your dentist today about a diagnosis and a night orthotic device to help correct the problem before it does long term damage.


Gingivitis is the inflammation of the gums. This is the initial stage of gum disease, and the earliest to treat.
Gingivitis is due to a long term effects of plaque deposits. Plaque is a sticky material made up of bacteria, mucus, and food debris that develops on the exposed parts of the tooth.'
Ways to reduce Gingivitis is to have your teeth cleaned on a regular bases. Brush and floss everyday, along with using a mouth rinse.

If you start noticing any of these symptoms consult with your dentist....

  • bleeding of the gums

  • bright red or red-purple appearance to gums

  • mouth sores

  • swollen gums

  • gums that are tender to touch