Thursday, February 14, 2019

Frequent Dental Surgery Questions

I recently had dental surgery, and before I could ask any questions the dental assistant went over all frequent questions that people ask!
  • What kind of foods can I eat after surgery?
    • Cold, soft foods like jello, pudding and cottage cheese
    •  Avoid hard, sharp foods like chips, nuts, and popcorn
  • I just had surgery, and the stitches already came out, is that okay?
    • Unless told otherwise, losing the stitches in not an emergency, they are usually placed to help control bleeding during the surgery. 
  •  How do I avoid a dry socket?
    • Don't smoke
    • Keep the surgery spot clean
    • dont over excert yourself
  • What do i do if the surgery site is still bleeding?
    • Place a small piece of gauze over the extraction site and bite down for 20-30 minutes at a time. 
    • It's not unusual to notice small amounts of blood during the healing process.
  • What about pain management?
    • The dentist usually prescribes a non-narcotic and narcotic pain medication. 
    • The best way to keep pain under control is to alternate the medications.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Massage May Help For TMJ Related Pain

If you suffer from TMJ, Bruxism or a misaligned jaw, you know that the pain associated with it is no joke!  Many people complain of headaches, muscle fatigue and clenching of the jaw.  Chewing food, yawning and sometimes swallowing and talking can be painful. 
As remedies go, what works for some won't always work for others but there is one treatment that seems to get positive reviews all across the board.  Massage!  It is not a cure all for the disease, however it can reduce pain and swelling and make movement of the jaw less painful. 
Look for a massage therapist in your area that is trained for TMJ, or, if you are into the self-care movement, there are plenty of online tutorials that explain how you can do your own massage.  Find something that works for you but always check with your dental provider first!

Keep Smiling!

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Take Oral Health To Heart

Valentines's Day isn't the only heat-related holiday celebrated in February! American Heart Month is celebrated every February to raise awareness for heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, but many people don't realize its connection to oral health. The same bad bacteria in your mouth that can cause tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease have been found in the plaques that build up in heart disease patients' arteries and make them more susceptible to heart attacks and strokes.

You can keep your mouth and heart healthy by brushing and flossing, avoiding tobacco products, exercising regularly and eating a diet that is low in cholesterol, fat, and salt!

Infornation is from a flyer I recived from my dentist, Dr. Ghasem K. Darian at Winning Smiles