Saturday, June 29, 2019

Can You Scuba Dive or Snorkel With Braces On Your Teeth?


Do you want to experience the underwater life this summer but feel like you can't because you have braces? 

Well, don't cancel your plans just yet because there is plenty of room for the regulator or snorkel to fit on the inside of your teeth but it's recommended to get comfortable with the equipment in your mouth long before you jump in the water.

If you plan on diving and you wear rubber bands, take them out before the dive. This is very important because they may snap, become lodged somewhere in your mouth or even the possibility of you swallowing them when you clear your ears and adjust to the pressure by wiggling your jaw.

As a certified scuba diver who had braces, I can say it was very easy and I barely noticed that I had my braces on. If you are still a bit wary, you may want to stick to the snorkeling or doing a shallow dive until you get more comfortable.

After every dive or snorkle, make sure to rinse your mouth with fresh water and drink plenty of water.

Good luck!

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Mouthwash is an Accent to Brushing, Not A Replacement

I am sure we have all been there, myself included. In a hurry, running late, don’t have time to brush, so you swish away some mouthwash and go on your merry little way. Well, we may be able to get away with it every once in a while, but making a habit of it can do more harm than good. Fluoride is good for your teeth, gums and mouth, but too much can have a counter-effect and make things worse.  Which is why using it correctly is important. 

Mouthwash is beneficial for killing germs, giving your teeth and gum that fluoride rinse, freshening your breath and breaking loose some particles between your teeth. However, brushing and flossing is more important.

Brushing removes the plaque and tartar and flossing cleans out between your teeth and gum line. Places you can’t get by swishing around mouthwash. There is no definitive answer of whether or not using mouthwash is more effective before or after you brush. So that may be something that you should consult with you dentist about and see what they recommend for you!

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Could A Plant-Based Diet Help Reduce Gingivitis?

According to a recent trial held at the University of Freiburg, in Germany explains that yes, a plant-based diet could help reduce gingivitis!

A randomized trial of 30 patients who suffer from gingivitis were split into two different groups, experimental and control. The experimental group changed their diet to low carb and animal protein and included foods rich in omega-3, vitamin c and d, antioxidants, plant nitrates and fibers for four weeks.

Each group was provided with the necessary tools to take care of their oral hygiene. Although the trial showed there were no differences in plaque reduction, the experimental group did, however, has less inflammation and bleeding to their gums. 

This trial was published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology.

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

MS And Your Oral Health

The effects of MS are widespread over the body but one thing many don't consider is how it can affect your oral health, both directly and indirectly.

As the disease progresses, motor function becomes impaired, pain can be intense, the immune system is suppressed.  Brushing and flossing can be difficult for these patients as motor function and dexterity are essential to be able to exercise proper hygiene.

In addition to motor function, medications can cause dry mouth, which creates a perfect place for bacteria to grow and leads to cavities and gum disease.  The use of steroids can weaken the immune system which in turn allows infections to flourish.

Depression is another factor in oral health management.  Depressed individuals may tend to push aside personal hygiene including brushing and flossing, so keeping a watchful eye on your loved one is important as they may need a gentle nudge here and there to get them back on track.

It is so very important that MS patients keep good oral hygiene.  To do that, they may need assistance.  In the event that it isn't possible, here are some suggestions that may help to make brushing a little easier for them.


  • Buy a thick handled toothbrush or wrap some type of gripping material around the handle to make it easier to hold.
  • Invest in an electric toothbrush.  It's easier to hold and doesn't require a lot of movement.  
  • Another good investment might be a Waterpik! Again, it requires less dexterity and movement. 
  • Ask a caregiver or a family member for help.
  • Schedule additional cleanings at the dentist.  Instead of the usual 2 per year, schedule 4 instead.  This helps keep ahead of gum disease.               
Keep Smiling!                                                                                                                                                                               

Thursday, June 13, 2019

The Unexpected Way Running Affects Your Teeth

We all know that exercising is great for your health. One of the primary reasons for running is that it helps lose weight, fight heart disease and relives stress. However, running can also have hidden negative effects on one of the most important parts of your body; Teeth.

When you add all the carbs, sports drinks and protein bars that are likely consumed during or after a workout, your mouth has the perfect environment for cavities. Sugar feeds decay-causing bacteria and our defenses against this bad bacteria live in our saliva.

While most runners breath through their mouth, the mouth is usually dry during the entire run which slows saliva rates and makes it harder for the mouth to clean its self. Therefore, when the mouth is dry, your teeth are at risk.

Here are a few things you can to save your teeth during a workout!
  1. Stay hydrated
  2. Pop a sugar-free mint or a piece gum after a workout (helps your saliva glands to start working again)
  3. Brush and floss regularly

Remember oral hygiene is very important!!



Tuesday, June 11, 2019

The New Charcoal Toothpaste Fad - Yea or Nay?

Fads are exactly that...fads.  While it may seem like a good thing, the opposite is often true. In the case of charcoal toothpaste, the results are in.  Not a good thing!!!  
Charcoal toothpaste can actually cause the damage to your teeth that it purports to prevent, according to a study published in the British Dental Journal.  It is an abrasive product.  It can actually wear away the enamel on your teeth making them more susceptible to decay, and can damage your gums.  There are a few charcoal toothpaste products that have fluoride, but with the abrasive properties of the toothpaste it does little to protect the enamel of the teeth.  
So, the jury is in, and charcoal toothpaste has been touted as a "marketing gimmick".  
Buyer beware!
If in doubt, the link to the article can be found here.  Don't be afraid to ask your dentist about it.  No doubt he/she will tell you the same thing.  

Keep Smiling! 

Thursday, June 6, 2019

Question From Our Member...

D. Jamis of Atlanta, Georgia asks: 

“I went to the dentist for an exam and cleaning but when they found that I had heart problems, they wouldn´t do anything until my cardiologist sent them a letter saying it was ok for them to work on me.  I think that´s dumb, don´t you?”

Savon’s Answer:

I guess dumb is in the eye of the beholder.  The reason for the concern is probably due to one or more of the medications that you are on.  As a rule of thumb, anyone with at heart condition is usually on some type of a blood thinner.  The dental facility needs to know if you need to and are able to stop taking your medication prior to having a dental procedure performed.

Original post is from our June 2019 newsletter!

Wednesday, June 5, 2019

Green Tea Drinker? It's a Good Thing for your Oral Health!

It's a commonly known fact that green tea has many health benefits.  It's a natural antioxidant and it's great for your digestive system. Aside from that, it apparently has oral health benefits!
The following tips are just a few ways your mouth can benefit from drinking Green Tea:

Did you know?

1. It can help to prevent and reduce Periodontal Inflammation
2. Evidence has shown that it can prevent and destroy Oral Cancer Cells
3. Inhibits the Formation of Dental Plaque
4. Repels Odor-Causing Bacteria, giving you better breath! 
Just a couple of cups a day can make a difference. Additionally, there are dental products out there that have Green Tea as an ingredient.  Look for these products in your local health food stores.  

This is another great reason to enjoy your afternoon tea!
Keep Smiling!