Thursday, August 22, 2019

Alignment Problems To Watch For In Children

When your children are between the ages of six and eight you will want to pay close attention to the alignment of their teeth.
If you notice any of the following problems, you will want to talk to an orthodontist about orthodontic treatment.
  • Excessive spacing: Usually happens with abnormal growth of the jawbone.
  • Crowding: This is when the jaw is too small to accommodate permanent teeth.
  • Under-bite: When the lower jaw grows larger than the upper jaw.
  • Over-bite: When the upper jaw grows larger than the lower jaw.
  • Open-bite: When the teeth are  unable to make physical contact for a proper bite.
  • Cross-bite: When the upper teeth close inside the lower teeth.
  • Over-jet (protruding): Teeth that are too far forward commonly known as "buck teeth".
If these problems are left untreated they can result in tooth decay, gum disease, headaches, and earaches, as well as speaking, biting or chewing problems.

Tuesday, August 20, 2019

RFID To Help Monitor Stress Level in Dental Patients

We don't really to talk too much about the stress of going to the dentist. Hence, the reason most people do not go unless they absolutely have to. Long waits in the waiting room, long waits in the opertory and just the stress of not knowing what is going to happen and whether it will be painful or not.

Well, researchers at Columbia University are using new technology to help with that. They are designing a new dental center that is built to monitor and reduce patient stress as well as speed up the process of a dental visit.

It is designed around a bracelet that the patient is given when they check in. This bracelet is equipped with RFID (radio frequency identification) technology. Once activated, the center will be able to tell where in the office the patient is located, what procedure they are having done, any dental information on file, how long they have been waiting and measure the patients stress level by measuring heart rate and respirations. They will also be able to tell the real time stress level of the patient while the procedure is being performed.

This is one piece of technology that I personally am very interested in and, if proven to work, would love to see in every dental center across the nation. Especially if it speeds up the visit like they suggest.

Thoughts, anyone?

Thursday, August 15, 2019

Swollen Gums Around One Tooth?

Yes, it's possible. I have experienced it myself a few years ago from eating an everything bagel. One of the seeds somehow got below the gum line and I didn't notice it until my gum became swollen around my front tooth.

There are many different reasons why gums can swell around just one tooth, these can include poor oral hygiene, gum disease, abscess or as I mentioned above, trapped food debris.

Although swollen gums may not be painful if it's not treated it can cause major problems down the road such as periodontal disease (gum disease).

Below are some home remedies that may help reduce the gum swelling:
  • Antiseptic mouthwash
  • Warm salt water rinse
  • Essential oil and warm water rinse (Tea tree oil)
  • Tumeric gel application
  • Brush and floss after every meal/snack
If swelling hasn't subsided after a few days, it's time to see your dentist!






Thursday, August 8, 2019

What Is Gingivostomatitis?

Have you ever heard of Gingivostomatitis?

Gingivostomatitis is a highly contagious mouth infection which causes painful sores, irritated gums, blisters, fever, bad breath and swelling in and around the mouth.

This infection can affect anyone but is seen more in children under the age of six.

There are many different factors that can cause gingivostomatitis:
  • Herpes Virus
  • Coxsackievirus (a virus that is transmitted by touching a contaminated surface)
  • Poor oral hygiene
  • bacteria
  • allergies
  • exposure to chemicals
  • radiation and chemotherapy
You can do some treatment on your own at home by:
  • Rinsing your mouth with warm saltwater
  • Avoiding spicy, salty or sour foods
  • Eat soft foods until the mouth is healed
  • Brush your teeth and gums with a periodontal toothbrush (super soft bristles) 
  • Take over the counter pain medications
If the symptoms are not starting to healing after a week or two it's time to seek medical attention!

Your dentist or doctor may take a culture or perform a biopsy to see if you have gingivostomatitis. If that is what you have, they may prescribe an antibiotic and clean the infected area to help promote faster healing!


Tuesday, August 6, 2019

MYTH'S BUSTED: CAVITIES

Cavities are no fun at all. No joke about that! However, there are a lot of myths out there about cavities. Let's see if we can play myth busters on a few of them.

MYTH: Only Sugar Can Cause Cavities:
FALSE:  Sorry mothers, I hate to take away your reason for your kid to have that candy car. Yes, sugar does cause cavities, but that is not the only culprit. If you want your kiddo to stay cavity free then you should steer them clear of bread and pasta, too. They contain starch, which is another cavity culprit.

MYTH: Extra Brushing Will Heal or Slow Down The Progression Of A Cavity
FALSE: Tooth enamel does not grow back. When you have a cavity, you need to get it filled. If you don't, you will eventually need a root canal and/or a crown. Brushing will not heal it or slow it down. Now, on the positive side, brushing will reduce the risk of obtaining more cavities and it will also keep the cavity clean and reduce the risk of infection.

MYTH: If I Have A Cavity, I Would Feel It
FALSE: Well, mostly false. If you feel the cavity and are experiencing pain, then you are probably dealing with a serious cavity that is much more advanced. When a cavity is starting chances are really good that you will not be able to feel it. Which is all the more the reason why regular dental checkups are so important.

So, it appears we have busted a few of the myths! I am sure there are many more. Do you have any that you would like to know about? Comment on this blog and we will try to find out if it is Myth or Fact!

Thursday, August 1, 2019

Effects Of Nitrous Oxide

You may have heard the term "laughing gas" but did you know the correct term is nitrous oxide?

Nitrous oxide is an orderless, colorless and safe sedative that is inhaled through a mask. Many people think they will be asleep during their procedure but this is not true. The patient will be alert and be able to respond to directions.


 Many dentists and doctors use "laughing gas" to make their anxious patients comfortable and help manage any pain they may experience.

 People react to certain things differently so some people may not experience any side effects, while some people may experience short term side effcts after the removal of the mask.

Short term side effects may include:
  • Dizziness
  • Sluggish
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Excessive sweating
  • Shivering 
The most common reason for these side effects is usually caused by inhaling the gas too quickly or by inhaling too much.

If a person is still experiencing these symptoms after a few days they should seek medical attention right away.