Thursday, July 11, 2019

Having Straight Teeth May Not Always Guarantee Happiness

Yes, you read that correctly!

According to Dr. Esma Dogramaci at the University of Adelaide Dental School in Australia, people who haven't had any orthodontic work and have varying levels of crooked teeth showed patterns of higher psychosocial scores, which means they were more optimistic than people who had orthodontic treatment.

The research was done to gauge how straight teeth affects peoples happiness. Researchers looked at how people handled new or challenging problems, how much they cared about their health, how much support they received from family and friends and optimistic levels.

What are your thoughts on this study?


Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Nail Biting is a Tough Habit To Break

Are you a nail biter? Do you know someone who is? If so, this is something you may want to pay attention to!! Nail biting is actually considered by some psychologists and physicians to be a form of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder(OCD). Here are some fast facts about nail biting that you may not know:
  • It is estimated that as many as 40% of teens and 30% of adults may be compulsive nail biters.
  • It is considered to be a nervous disorder, and even an indication of anxiety and passive aggression.
  • It is (in some cases) also hereditary!
  • Thumb sucking and lip biting fall into the same catagory.
The effects of nail biting on the teeth and gums is a serious issue. Long term, it can weaken the structure of your teeth and cause them to loosen, chip or crack. It can also cause misalignment. Bacteria lives under your fingernails, and it is introduced into your mouth when you bite your nails, carrying the possibility of viruses like E-Coli, influenza, the common cold and other diseases that we can't even pronounce... Think about it...whatever you've touched recently may still be lurking around under your nails. Ugh! In addition to that, constant nail biting can cause permanent damage to your nails and nailbed. There are topical applications that have proven useful for kids who are nail biters, but it isn't really effective for teens and adults. Therapy is useful, but expensive. For most, it is a very hard habit to break but have faith....it can be done!
Ladies, you may benefit most from this remedy...switch to acrylic nails and manicures that include polish and artwork! I have personally known people who have successfully grown out their nails by doing this. It works!

As always, Keep Smiling!

Thursday, July 4, 2019

Stay Safe This Fourth Of July!

Happy Independence Day!


Today the majority of us will be celebrating with our family and friends by enjoying some bbq, attending concerts, hanging out by the water and finishing up the night by watching fireworks!

Did you know the Fourth of July is one the leading holidays for injuries?  According to the Pew Research Center on average more than 45,000 people visit the emergency room for injuries from July 4 -5 every year due to fireworks.

Every year it seems like there is always some kind of story on the news of people who are trying to show off to their family and friends. Some of these stories include: Setting firecrackers off in their hands, on a boat, out of their butt crack, making firecracker bombs and the list goes on.

But, the most disturbing one to me are the people who let firecrackers go off in their mouth?

If a firecracker explodes in a person's mouth it makes restoring oral functions very challenging if they survive.

The explosion can cause loss of teeth, broken jaws, severe burns, and injury to the upper airway caused by smoke inhalation. The road to recovery call be very painful and long.

If you are planning on setting off fireworks tonight, please do it responsibly!

Tuesday, July 2, 2019

Milk...A Tooth-Protecting Superfood!

If you are an avid milk drinker like me, then this is a blog you definitely want to read. I go through 2 gallons of milk a week, and I mean I GO through it. I personally drink at least 2 gallons of milk a week. What can I say, I love milk! So I had to ask to the question, is it good for your teeth? Well, great news my fellow milk drinkers! IT IS!

It has been proven that dairy products such as milk and cheese actually reduce tooth decay. Milk contains proteins called caseins which will join together with the calcium and phosphorus to create a protective later on the surface of your teeth. (aka enamel). This helps prevent tooth decay by reducing the bacterial acids. Furthermore, the calcium and phosphorus also help strengthen and even repair the enamel on your teeth.

So, drink up my fellow milkaholics. It will help keep our smiles bright!

Oh yeah on a side note: The ADA has recommended not to have milk and cookies because as we all know they sugary items such as cookies are bad for your teeth. However... there is still hope for us on that too. The it is recommended that you have the cookies THEN the milk. That will eliminate the sugar acids that plague your teeth.

As great as that sounds, milk and cookies always sounds better than cookies then milk or milk after cookies, and we all it know it tastes better too!

Saturday, June 29, 2019

Can You Scuba Dive or Snorkel With Braces On Your Teeth?


Do you want to experience the underwater life this summer but feel like you can't because you have braces? 

Well, don't cancel your plans just yet because there is plenty of room for the regulator or snorkel to fit on the inside of your teeth but it's recommended to get comfortable with the equipment in your mouth long before you jump in the water.

If you plan on diving and you wear rubber bands, take them out before the dive. This is very important because they may snap, become lodged somewhere in your mouth or even the possibility of you swallowing them when you clear your ears and adjust to the pressure by wiggling your jaw.

As a certified scuba diver who had braces, I can say it was very easy and I barely noticed that I had my braces on. If you are still a bit wary, you may want to stick to the snorkeling or doing a shallow dive until you get more comfortable.

After every dive or snorkle, make sure to rinse your mouth with fresh water and drink plenty of water.

Good luck!

Wednesday, June 26, 2019

Mouthwash is an Accent to Brushing, Not A Replacement

I am sure we have all been there, myself included. In a hurry, running late, don’t have time to brush, so you swish away some mouthwash and go on your merry little way. Well, we may be able to get away with it every once in a while, but making a habit of it can do more harm than good. Fluoride is good for your teeth, gums and mouth, but too much can have a counter-effect and make things worse.  Which is why using it correctly is important. 

Mouthwash is beneficial for killing germs, giving your teeth and gum that fluoride rinse, freshening your breath and breaking loose some particles between your teeth. However, brushing and flossing is more important.

Brushing removes the plaque and tartar and flossing cleans out between your teeth and gum line. Places you can’t get by swishing around mouthwash. There is no definitive answer of whether or not using mouthwash is more effective before or after you brush. So that may be something that you should consult with you dentist about and see what they recommend for you!

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Could A Plant-Based Diet Help Reduce Gingivitis?

According to a recent trial held at the University of Freiburg, in Germany explains that yes, a plant-based diet could help reduce gingivitis!

A randomized trial of 30 patients who suffer from gingivitis were split into two different groups, experimental and control. The experimental group changed their diet to low carb and animal protein and included foods rich in omega-3, vitamin c and d, antioxidants, plant nitrates and fibers for four weeks.

Each group was provided with the necessary tools to take care of their oral hygiene. Although the trial showed there were no differences in plaque reduction, the experimental group did, however, has less inflammation and bleeding to their gums. 

This trial was published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology.