Thursday, February 14, 2019

Frequent Dental Surgery Questions

I recently had dental surgery, and before I could ask any questions the dental assistant went over all frequent questions that people ask!
  • What kind of foods can I eat after surgery?
    • Cold, soft foods like jello, pudding and cottage cheese
    •  Avoid hard, sharp foods like chips, nuts, and popcorn
  • I just had surgery, and the stitches already came out, is that okay?
    • Unless told otherwise, losing the stitches in not an emergency, they are usually placed to help control bleeding during the surgery. 
  •  How do I avoid a dry socket?
    • Don't smoke
    • Keep the surgery spot clean
    • dont over excert yourself
  • What do i do if the surgery site is still bleeding?
    • Place a small piece of gauze over the extraction site and bite down for 20-30 minutes at a time. 
    • It's not unusual to notice small amounts of blood during the healing process.
  • What about pain management?
    • The dentist usually prescribes a non-narcotic and narcotic pain medication. 
    • The best way to keep pain under control is to alternate the medications.

Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Massage May Help For TMJ Related Pain

If you suffer from TMJ, Bruxism or a misaligned jaw, you know that the pain associated with it is no joke!  Many people complain of headaches, muscle fatigue and clenching of the jaw.  Chewing food, yawning and sometimes swallowing and talking can be painful. 
As remedies go, what works for some won't always work for others but there is one treatment that seems to get positive reviews all across the board.  Massage!  It is not a cure all for the disease, however it can reduce pain and swelling and make movement of the jaw less painful. 
Look for a massage therapist in your area that is trained for TMJ, or, if you are into the self-care movement, there are plenty of online tutorials that explain how you can do your own massage.  Find something that works for you but always check with your dental provider first!

Keep Smiling!

Thursday, February 7, 2019

Take Oral Health To Heart

Valentines's Day isn't the only heat-related holiday celebrated in February! American Heart Month is celebrated every February to raise awareness for heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States, but many people don't realize its connection to oral health. The same bad bacteria in your mouth that can cause tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease have been found in the plaques that build up in heart disease patients' arteries and make them more susceptible to heart attacks and strokes.

You can keep your mouth and heart healthy by brushing and flossing, avoiding tobacco products, exercising regularly and eating a diet that is low in cholesterol, fat, and salt!

Infornation is from a flyer I recived from my dentist, Dr. Ghasem K. Darian at Winning Smiles

Thursday, January 31, 2019

Soda Vs. Egg Experiment For Kids

Currently, a Polar Vortex is reeking havoc on the majority of the United States. Schools, State agencies, and major stores have been closed for almost a week due to extreme temperatures.

Kids can get extremely bored being cooped up all day, and I'm sure most parents have pulled out all the stops to keep their kids bordem at an all-time low.

How about learning healthy brushing habits by doing a fun experiment?

Supplies:
  • ADA-accepted toothpaste
  • ADA-accepted toothbrush
  • Hard-boiled egg
  • Cup
  • Dark soda or juice 
 Tell your children that they will be doing an experiment to see what happens when the outer shell of the egg is exposed to the soda or juice. *The egg is the replica of a tooth*

  • Submerge the hard-boiled egg into a glass of soda or juice and let it sit overnight. 
    • Take bets on what will happen to the egg.
  •  In the morning remove the egg from the soda or juice and let the children examine the egg. 
    • What's the color look like?
    • Is the egg as hard as it was the night before?
    • Explain that this is what happens to your teeth when you eat/drink sugary products.
  • Now load up the egg with toothpaste and try to scrub away the strains!
Hopefully, this is a fun experiment for the kids and one they will never forget!

The experiment found here!

Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Is Sedation Dentistry The Right Choice For You?

If you are dental phobic, anxious because you have a long complex procedure ahead of you or are having oral surgery, conscious sedation may just be right for you! What if you could have your dental procedures done while "consciously asleep" and wake up with no memory or trauma whatsoever? It sounds too good to be true but it is becoming a safe and efficient way for a dentist to treat severely anxious or phobic patients.
Conscious sedation allows you to relax in the chair while allowing the dentist to complete long or complex procedures without further distressing you. Now, please don't confuse this with general anesthesia, because it isn't! You will still be able to respond to questions and follow instructions. You will typically still be given local anesthesia such as lidocaine, but won't remember the shot. While you are not actually physically asleep through the procedure, you may think that you were because of the mind-erasing effect.
The process is rather simple. A small pill, such as triazolam, is given approximately an hour before the procedure. More medication may be given depending on the patients response to the first pill. Everyone is different. It is advised to ask someone to drive you to and from the appointment.
Now, keep in mind that not every doctor is able to use this form of sedation. It requires special training and certification.  This includes Cardiac Life Support training to help ensure the safety of the patient in an emergency.
It is becoming a more popular way to treat anxious and fearful patients, but as always, do your homework first. Check the doctors credentials and make sure he/she has had the proper training, or has a qualified, licensed anesthetist on staff.

Now this is something to smile about! So, Keep Smiling!

Thursday, January 24, 2019

Hydrogen Peroxide: Benefits For The Mouth

Keeping hydrogen peroxide on hand comes with many other benefits besides cleaning cuts and wounds. Did you know that you can use hydrogen peroxide in your mouth?

Whitening teeth - Hydrogen peroxide is a bleaching agent but not as effective as other whitening methods.

Easing a sore throat - Gargling hydrogen peroxide may ease discomfort by reducing the bacteria count.

Gum Disease - Since hydrogen peroxide contains antibacterial properties, it may help treat gum disease.
When plaque forms on the teeth, it consists of a slimy film of bacteria called biofilm and when hydrogen peroxide is used it releases oxygen that helps destroy that bacteria.

Mouth sores -Like I mentioned above with all of its antibacterial properties, hydrogen peroxide may help treat minor mouth irritations like canker sores and cuts from braces.

Mouthwash - Mix equal parts of hydrogen peroxide and water and swish around the mouth.

Disinfectant - That's right, soaking your toothbrush in hydrogen peroxide helps kill germs. It also works on retainers and mouth guards!

Here are a few important notes:
*Do not use any type of hydrogen peroxide. Use  3% concentration!
*You may experience foaming in the mouth, don't worry its normal!
*To avoid irritations, limit usage to 1 time a week!


Information found here and here!




Tuesday, January 22, 2019

The Interesting Functionality of Taste Buds

When your're taking a bite of a big, juicy burger or sipping on a milkshake, you know one thing... It tastes good, right? Did you ever think about why that is? 


Your tongue and the roof of your mouth are covered in thousands of these tiny little buds. When you eat, your saliva helps break down food. Your taste buds send little messages to your brain which tell you all kinds of information like whether or not the food tastes good, if it's hot, cold, sweet, sour, etc.

Taste buds are most important because they play the biggest part in how we enjoy different foods and flavors. As a child, you would have been more sensitive to different foods because your taste buds were not only on your tongue, but on the roof and the sides of your mouth. As an adult, you may notice that certain foods you were unable to eat as a child taste better. This is because your taste buds are more centered to your tongue area and are now less sensitive.

Here are some tidbits of information about your taste buds:

-Buds that taste bitterness are located at the back of the tongue. Sour taste buds are located on either side of the tongue, with salty/sweet buds on the tip. The center of the tongue does not have many taste buds. There is research that disputes this theory.  Some believe that there are no "zones" in your mouth for sensing specific tastes.  Who knows?  Things (and theories) are always changing!

- The five taste categories are salty, bitter, sweet, sour and umami (savory).

- If you get fat, so does your tongue!  This is believed to be a contributing factor in Sleep Apnea.

- Taste buds are not visible to the naked eye.

-Taste is the weakest of the 5 senses.

- Girls have more taste buds than boys.

-We have approximately 2000-4000 taste buds inside our mouths.

Taste on, and Keep Smiling!